People are people because they cook - Launch of the new series ti Cooking Culture with Christoph Hauser

People are people because they cook - Launch of the new series ti Cooking Culture with Christoph Hauser

Cuisine, cooking and culture: That’s what you’ll find as of this issue in our new newsletter series ti Cooking Culture. Christoph Hauser, chef, innovator and organizer, takes you on a culinary trip through the cultures of this Earth, from their inception to the present. 

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Competency models in leadership workshops – a project report from China

Competency models in leadership workshops – a project report from China

End of last year ti communication supported a mid-sized German enterprise group with the roll-out of their new performance management system at their China subsidiaries. Two trainings were facilitated by Dr Laurenz Awater, Chief Representative of ti communication in China, introducing a new competency model developed for the client’s global organization.
Competency models are an integral part of any strategy aimed at building a high performing organization. Competency models are an important instrument because they have proven to be helpful in

  • defining corporate identity and giving the organization overall direction
  • clarifying performance expectations by providing specific behavioral descriptions
  • making performance management a more effective process by transforming traditional performance review sessions into future-oriented development sessions
  • creating a performance culture and an appreciative feedback culture
  • redirecting the orientation of individuals and teams from monetary incentives toward maximization of development potentials
  • aligning company and individual development around commonly shared values and goals
  • forming a leadership culture which moves developing others to the centre of leadership behavior
  • building a corporate culture based upon core values and principles set out for the global organization
  • creating a common language among employees across hierarchies and national boundaries

Participants discussed the competencies and behavioral descriptors and learnt their application in performance appraisals by making self-assessments and preparing for appraisal sessions using case studies.

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Football – from a street competition to a popular stadium sport

Football – from a street competition to a popular stadium sport

Everyone around the world knows what football is. Due to its simple rules and minimal equipment, it is one of the most popular and widespread sports on the planet. But just how did football come to be? In the spirit of the upcoming 2014 World Championships, tiSpotlight will provide you with a look at the birth of football. The origins of football stretch far back into the past and are not only situated in Europe. Games similar to football were played ages ago in China, Japan and the pre-Columbian cultures of Central America, home to a long tradition of ball sports. In Europe, traces of games similar to football can be found in Greece and Italy, among other places. Yet England is considered the home country of football. Unlike modern football, in those days, the game was much less organised and played without fixed rules. Thus, it was often rough and violent. Even the early form of modern football, which was played in medieval England, did not have set rules.  At that time, entire villages participated in a single game, with the goal of getting the ball into the opponent’s town gate. The playing field was situated between the participating villages – no matter how far away they were from each other. Thus, it was possible for a playing field to stretch over several kilometres. There was no limit to the number of players, and often the whole village, including its roads, squares and fields, were included. During the game, everything was allowed, which meant that they often became out-and-out competitions between the villages or towns. Due to the high frequency of injuries among participants and the general degeneration of the games, football was repeatedly prohibited throughout the years. By 1840, football had largely become a forgotten sport among townspeople, due to these prohibitions. At around the same time, however, on another level, there was a new breakthrough in football: The sport was included in the class schedule of elite private schools. The idea behind this move initially was to promote discipline, order and solidarity as well as to impart new values. Football continued to be disorganised and included fairly random rules, since each school set its own. When the number of teams began to increase, it became necessary to formulate binding rules for the sport. Thus, In October of 1863, there was a meeting in London in which the first official rules and uniform standards were determined for football. At this meeting, football was also officially separated from rugby, since one of the main rules of football prohibited carrying the ball. After the rules had been set, football quickly became very popular in all social classes and amassed a large number of followers. The first international match between England and Scotland took place as early as 1872. The rules of football were repeatedly amended or supplemented. The popularity of the sport not only spread throughout Europe, but to countries all over the world, and gradually became the game we know today.

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ti communication sportlight - Bossaball

ti communication sportlight - Bossaball

Brazil – THE land of football? With five world championships for the men’s national team, Brazil is the most successful football nation of the world, and has produced some of the biggest stars in international football, such as Pelé, Ronaldo, Ronaldinho and Kaká. There’s no doubt about it – football is Brazil’s national sport par excellence. In addition to football and steamy samba rhythms, however, Brazilian sports have lots more to offer. Have you heard of the new trend sport bossaball? While it’s true that the origins of bossaball are in Spain, Filip Eyckmans, Belgian by birth, was inspired by the Afro-Brazilian martial art and dance form capoeira when he developed this unique new sport in 2003. He was also influenced by his impressions of Brazil’s beach culture, in which football, volleyball, dance and music, as well as trampolining, which has been popular since the 90s, play a large role. And so, the quirky new creation of bossaball came into being, a team sport with two teams of two to five players each, who face each other on a giant air pillow with a net dividing the playing field in half, as in volleyball. There is also a round trampoline on each half, enabling the players to perform spectacular, acrobatic moves. The jumps, sometimes metres high, represent the special allure of bossaball, for players and spectators alike, the latter of whom are fired up by the so-called samba referee. Besides referee duties, the samba referee, equipped with a flute, microphone, percussion instruments and a DJ console, provides the right atmosphere. By the way, former tennis pro Filip Eyckmans based the name of the sport on the Brazilian dance bossa nova, which can be translated as “new wave”. Not only have the Spanish and Brazilians caught this new wave – in the meantime, bossaball is played in international competitions, already very popular in Holland and Germany as well. Do you remember how much fun it was to romp around in a bouncing castle as a child? Have you had enough of football after the world cup? Maybe the new trend sport bossaball is just the right thing for you!

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Moving abroad with a peace of mind: Tips for a hassle-free expatriation

Moving abroad with a peace of mind: Tips for a hassle-free expatriation

New year - new country? We welcome you all, dear readers in the new year with a bog articl of our partner Froesch Group. Learn in the articl here below how to manage your motivg abroad successfully. Have fun!

Every year thousands of Germans leave their home country. Whether because of professional reasons, the yearning for a life in a foreign culture or to enjoy the well-deserved retirement in a warmer climate – in 2013 alone, Germany counted almost 800,000 emigrants. Emigration is an exciting adventure, peppered with many challenges. Above all, moving with a family and a full household of furniture and effects is a common stress factor. The following tips can help to make your move process as smooth as possible for you and your family:

1. Trust a relocation specialist

Choose a moving company that offers complete door-to-door moves from a single source, including customs clearance. This not only saves time, but gives you peace of mind. The removals company should have extensive experience in handling international moves and be able to provide appropriate references. Memberships in recognized moving associations (e.g. FIDI, Omni and IAM) guarantee compliance with international quality standards.

2. Pay attention to the services offered

A good moving service includes transportation from door to door, professional (dis-) assembling of furniture, packing and unpacking of all goods and the disposal of all packaging material. A good moving company offers to organize the installation of kitchens and connection of appliances. In most cases, these works are exclusive and will be invoiced separately.

3. Ask for additional support

In addition to the handling of the actual move, some moving companies also offer relocation services. Experienced relocation consultants assist you with visa applications, home and school search, registration with local authorities and much more. Ask for individual service packages.

4. Stay on top of the moving process

If possible, you should be present on the moving days to answer any questions the moving team might have. On the day of packing, the moving company will create an inventory list with all goods to be transported. Check if the list is complete, get it signed by the team leader and keep a copy. Remember to give the moving company your contact details in the destination country, so they can easily get hold of you. On the day of moving in, have a furniture position plan ready. This will ensure that all items will end up in the right places and you do not have to move around furniture yourself.

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The First Time – Hurray, I’m the boss now! What makes new managers leaders

The First Time – Hurray, I’m the boss now! What makes new managers leaders

Suddenly, everything has changed! The employees don’t treat you like a colleague anymore, superiors suddenly expect so much more from you, and then you place yourself under pressure, too. Meeting all expectations is an art form that nowadays unfortunately is often only learned through years of experience. In order to reduce the anxiety and stress of new managers, the teaching of management behaviour and the use of tools and resources provide a solid start to navigating safely through the challenges of everyday management.
In the education of young people, personnel management often plays only a minor role, if any at all. With the best business and technical education in their pocket, they are often met with

a great challenge for which they are largely unprepared. This repeatedly leads to situations where young managers, lacking alternatives, orient themselves toward successful superiors. There is nothing wrong with that per se. However, the question is: Does that represent personal leadership style, or must the imitator invest a disproportionately large amount of energy in being a credible copy? Wouldn’t that energy be more usefully expended elsewhere? Behaviour that is contrary to one’s own values and personality structure costs enormous amounts of energy and leads to frustration and a decline in performance, for the new manager as well as his or her colleagues. The initial enthusiasm of the new person often disappears quickly. Energy and enthusiasm for the task at hand diminish and create resistance.

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Fail in foreign trade - Ten ways to waste money abroad: The tenth case: We don’t have any premises and we don’t need a subsidiary

Fail in foreign trade - Ten ways to waste money abroad: The tenth case: We don’t have any premises and we don’t need a subsidiary

An article of InterGest, partner of ti communication

Ms. Diener runs a industrial-cleaning company at the German- Dutch border, and she has about 200 employees. In Germany, her important customers include Deutsche Bahn and large hotels. Her employees come from all over, mainly from Eastern Europe, but they always have valid German employment contracts and are naturally properly registered.
During a trade association event, Ms. Diener comes in contact with a Dutch businessman who owns a hotel in the Netherlands with more than 200 beds, and who is looking for a company to do the necessary cleaning work. Previously, the hotel had its own cleaners and maids, but the personnel and social security costs have become so large that it seems very reasonable to outsource these activities.
After some negotiation, they come to an agreement, and Ms. Diener is asked to provide the cleaning crews for the hotel immediately. Ms. Diener assigns about 15 people to the Dutch hotel, and every day they drive about 30 km from Germany to their workplace in the neighbouring country.
Some time passes, and both business partners are quite satisfied with the deal they have made. Ms. Diener is earning good money in the Netherlands, and the hotel owner is very pleased. Everything is going perfectly. Everything? Well, yes, as long as you ignore the fact that Ms. Diener is providing services in a foreign country and acting as if there were no tax implications. In fact, it never even occurred to Ms. Diener that she could establish premises in the Netherlandsfor her work; so she conscientiously adds German value-added tax to the invoices for her company’s services and pays taxes on her earnings in Germany.

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Wherever you are, we’re already there! - Our 2015 Training Programme is here!

Wherever you are, we’re already there! - Our 2015 Training Programme is here!

In the coming year, ti communication will continue to be at work for you all over the world! In addition to our training venues in Germany and Austria, we also offer open training courses in eight international cities. Shanghai is the newest training location as of 2015. Below, you can find out more about our international venues and their respective trainers.

Chicago

Vivian Manasse, ti communication Senior Expert for Brazil and Germany, is your on-site contact in Chicago. Here she offers the courses “Intercultural Training Brazil - Business Skills for Specialists and Executives” and “Intercultural Training Germany - Business Skills for Specialists and Executives”.

Düsseldorf

Düsseldorf is a metropolitan area with great economic power. In 2015, you are welcome to join the “Intercultural Training Brazil” conducted by our trainer Cristina Ramalho as well as the “Intercultural Training Korea” by our trainer Suk-Geong Han.

Frankfurt

The topic of our training course in Frankfurt is „Cultural Awareness – Intercultural Management Training for Specialists and Executive“. It will be conducted by Anna Corbett, who will also happily offer you a customized in-house training for your company, if desired.

Hamburg

In Hamburg, we are offering you the open training courses „Business Skills for Specialists and Executives“ on the countries France and Sweden. Furthermore, open training courses on the topics “Reintegration” and “Leading Intercultural Teams” will take place here.

Istanbul

In Istanbul, Çalışkan Çağlayan, ti communication Senior Expert for Turkey, invites you to an intercultural course for Turkey. He is a corporate consultant, intercultural trainer and qualified captain of the high seas. He has not been at sea for a while now, having traded in his time to navigate the construction of intercultural bridges between Germany, Austria and Turkey.

Moscow

In Moscow, Galina Koptelzewa, ti communication Senior Expert for Russia, conducts intercultural training courses on Russia: “Moscow offers a number of advantages as a business location. Nevertheless, you should not underestimate the challenges there. I now also look forward to familiarizing enterprises with Russian culture in open training courses and supporting them in tapping their full synergistic potential.”

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Fail in foreign trade - Ten ways to waste money abroad: The ninth case: Let’s go to China – after all, everyone else is doing it

Fail in foreign trade - Ten ways to waste money abroad: The ninth case: Let’s go to China – after all, everyone else is doing it

An article of InterGest, partner of ti communication

Altmeier makes windows. He makes good windows – the kind that really save energy and also look great. Altmeier also supports the local soccer club for the large city of Stemmelfeld, and he is a model entrepreneur for the entire region. He is innovative, environ­mentally friendly, a supporter of local business, creates jobs, and a great guy all around.

In late 2005, it happened that an ambitious politician from the Stemmelfeld district was able to attract a few potential investors for his district during a trip to China. He quickly found a group of Chinese people who were interested in acting as a delegation to Germany, in order to see for themselves what kinds of investments could be made in China or Germany as part of a cooperation.

When it came time to get ready for the visitors from China, Alt­meier was contacted. He would be introduced to the Chinese dele­gation, present his factory and his products, and represent German entrepreneurs as a whole. No one else seemed better suited, and no one could do it better.

In the days before the delegation’s visit, Altmeier polished his factory to a high shine and made everything look nice, even going so far as to display three Chinese flags. The delegation could come any time now.

When they finally arrived, everything went very fast. The Chi­nese visitors came, were in fact impressed by Altmeier’s factory, and immediately took over. Altmeier followed along behind the dele­gates, was asked to sit next to the head of the Chinese delegation, and a few “ganbei”s later Altmeier was inevitably invited to visit China. He simply needed to see for himself, they said, what amazing opportunities there were in China for his company. Investing in China would be the ideal approach for him.

Just three months later, Altmeier was in China, welcomed heartily by the members of the last delegation. He was taken everywhere, was shown the fast-growing industrial zones and was extremely impressed by the growth figures, which people could only dream of back in “good old Germany.”

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Fail in foreign trade - Ten ways to waste money abroad: The eighth case: Use a trade representative as your only sales distributor in the target country

Fail in foreign trade - Ten ways to waste money abroad: The eighth case: Use a trade representative as your only sales distributor in the target country

An article of InterGest, partner of ti communication

Mr. Schmidt makes wonderful furniture out of rattan and woven materials. His company relies on true handcrafting and prides itself on being exclusively “made in Germany.” This quality standard is sacred to him – and above all, it justifies his fairly high prices; compared to the competition mainly from Indonesia, Mr. Schmidt’s products are more than twice as expensive.
Last year, Mr. Schmidt went to the furniture trade show in Paris and exhibited his valuable products there. He knows there is a large market for his products in France, and the South of France in particular promises to be a fantastic market.
The trade fair began, and Mr. Schmidt’s optimism was not in fact misplaced. Straight away, there were many interested retailers at his stand on the first day, admiring the great quality, professionally noting the excellent craftsmanship and showing a strong interest in buying. The interested parties also agreed that the prices were in the upper range, but that there was a strong enough target group in the target region of the southern coast.
However, Mr. Schmidt now faced a dilemma: he had a large number of potential customers who wanted to purchase relatively small quantities. There was a furniture store in Cannes that wanted to take a couple of armchairs – preferably on commission – and another one in St. Tropez that was interested in two sofas.
Just as Mr. Schmidt’s mood was slowly starting to darken, M. Dujardin appeared at the exhibition stand and declared that he had the ultimate concept for him to ensure business success in France. M. Dujardin said that he was a successful importer of high-quality garden furniture, and that Schmidt’s woven furniture would round out his product portfolio perfectly.

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